The Datachix Blog











{July 17, 2013}   Power Query –Where did my query script icon go?!?

by Julie

 

I hadn’t played with Data Explorer Power Query since it became Power Query last week with the announcement of Power BI for Office 365. Since I am presenting on it at the Microsoft Integration Architects group this week, I opened it up to prep the demos. By the way, Power Query is very cool. It’s an Excel Add-in that allows an information worker to perform self service BI. With Power Pivot and Power View, it completes a self service BI trifecta of ETL, compressed storage and presentation. Now that Power BI is available as a cloud service, this not only gives users a complete stack of BI tools, but allows those tools to be more easily accessed via mobile devices.

Since Power Query is designed to be a self service tool, it focuses on ETL by way of drag and drop/gui tools. However, one of my favorite features of Power Query was that you can access and copy the underlying code (which is a language called “M” by the way), make a few slight changes to it and reuse. For instance if I needed data from several tables on the internet on different urls, but they all have the same structure, I could labor through the first page with the gui, then copy that code, paste it into notepad, change the url address of the source only and paste the new code into a new Power Query. and BAM! It’ done.

This was all accomplished via the query script icon, a cute little fella that looks like a scrolled piece of paper.

powerquery

All of the steps on the right hand column above represent pieces of work done via the gui to get the data in this format. By clicking on the query script icon, I get this:

powerqueryM

which I can modify and paste into new queries.

But back to my story of a
change between Data Explorer and Power Query. In Data Explorer, the query script icon was always there. I spent a good ten minutes one night this week in a cold panic, wondering if I had forgotten how to “work” Power Query, because I couldn’t find it after upgrading. It appears that now you have to expressly enable this feature by going to Options under Machine Settings and clicking “Enable Advanced Query Editing.” See my steps 1,2, and 3 below.

enablingScrollyThingie

So there you have it people. Happy Advanced Querying.

Shameless plugs:

Going to be in the Indianapolis area August 9th? Interested in learning the basics of how to create and load a data warehouse? Join Audrey and me for “From Here to BI: Data Warehousing with SQL Server MVPs Audrey Hammonds and Julie Smith.” We’ll also be presenting for SQL Saturday #242 main event on August 10th. Look forward to seeing you there.

Also don’t miss Audrey’s session for 24 Hours of PASS– Design Matters! The Performance Impact of Database Design



Stuart says:

I am going to be at your session in Indiana. Do you know if there are enough participants to hold the session? I have had other sessions like this cancel late in the game.

Stuart



I think we’ll be fine-have 9 signed up so far and 2 weeks to go!



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